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Global food demand patterns over changing levels of economic development

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Agriculture and Trade Analysis Division in [Washington, DC] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Food supply.,
  • Food consumption.,
  • Economic development.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementSuzanne Marie Marks, Mervin J. Yetley.
SeriesERS staff report -- no. AGES 870910.
ContributionsYetley, Mervin J., United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service. Agriculture and Trade Analysis Division.
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 42 p. :
Number of Pages42
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17661960M

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Food consumption patterns and economic growth. Increasing affluence and the use of natural resources. Gerbens-Leenes PW(1), Nonhebel S, Krol MS. Author information: (1)University of Twente, AE, The Netherlands. [email protected] by: The objective of this paper is to project the pattern of global food demand in for both aggregate food and disaggregate food products (i.e., grain, livestock, horticulture and vegetables, and other food products). To achieve this objective, two goals are set. Economic Growth, Convergence, and World Food Demand and Supply The projected increase in world population from billion in to well over 9 billion in has received a great deal of attention as an influence on world demand for food (United Nations ).File Size: 1MB. Over the period –, the population of Tunisia increased by 70%, while annual per capita GDP tripled from to US$ (World Bank, ). In general, economic growth goes along with changes in food consumption patterns.

Although the global supply of protein has been increasing, the distribution of the increase in the protein supply is unequal. The per capita supply of vegetable protein is slightly higher in developing countries, while the supply of animal protein is three times higher in industrialized countries.   Marks, S.M. and Yetley, M.J. Global food demand patterns over changing levels of economic development. Washington, DC: United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. Google ScholarCited by:   This article reviews demand modeling approaches from 10 global economic models participating in the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). We compare food demand projections in for various regions and agricultural products under harmonized scenarios of socioeconomic development, climate change, and bioenergy Cited by: “The future of food demand: understanding differences in global economic models” • Schmitz, van Meijl et al., “Land-use change trajectories up to insights from a global agro-economic model comparison” • Müller and Robertson, “Projecting future crop productivity for global economic modeling”File Size: KB.

principal features of the food econ-omy at the national level, including the standard of living, patterns of economic growth, population dy-namics and human fertility, food security, agricultural development, and an analysis of food consump-tion (dietary changes, consumption trends, and obesity problems in the affluent nations). Global food demand patterns over changing levels of economic development. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Agriculture and Trade Analysis Division, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors. Predicting future food demand is a critical step for formulating the agricultural, economic and conservation policies required to feed over 9 billion people by while doing minimal harm to the by: 1. While projected income changes have the highest partial impact on per capita food consumption levels, population growth leads to the highest increase in total food production. The impact of technical change is amplified or mitigated by adaptations of land management intensities.